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Florida’s Introduced Nonindigenous and Invasive Fishes: Part 1 of a 3-part Series on Biological Invasions in Florida

This article is a repost from 2015. It discusses the species of introduced fishes in Florida’s freshwater and marine habitats, along with a general discussion of biological invasions as a potential driver of loss-of-habitat functions.  Future articles in the series will discuss introduced mollusks (bivalves and gastropods) and herptiles (amphibians and reptiles) of Florida.

Waterbodies such as streams, lakes, ponds, and oceans are well known for their habitat functions, especially their ability to support aquatic wildlife by providing sustenance and shelter.  A myriad of animals, from tiny arthropods to 12-meter-long whale sharks, rely on native organisms as food.   Many waterbodies support some of the most productive habitats in the world, providing food and shelter for mollusks, crustaceans, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, and often serve as vital nursery grounds for these species.  Others are nutrient-poor and relatively unproductive.  Nevertheless, hundreds of imperiled species require aquatic habitats for survival.  Along with their threatened or endangered wildlife, waterbodies themselves are threatened in many ways.  Anthropogenic disturbances include groundwater depletion, reallocation of surface water, nutrient inputs, habitat fragmentation, fire suppression, pollution, land use changes, overharvesting, climate change, dredging, and the introduction of nonindigenous plants and animals (Exhibit 1).

Exhibit 1 of JCS Introduced Fishes Writeup 012815

Reducing the effects of invasive nonindigenous species is an important part of restoration and management efforts in natural areas of Florida, the United States, and worldwide.  These species cause significant stress to native ecosystems (Adams and Steigerwalt 2010), and biological invasion is widely viewed as a major cause of the reduction in native plant and animal diversity (Elton 1958, Wilcove et al. 1998).  Invasive species are known to affect most natural areas of the United States (Villazon 2009) and worldwide (Sala et al. 2000), and aquatic habitats are particularly susceptible to nonindigenous species due in part to the fact that aquatic habitats act as biological sinks, receiving plant and animal genetic material from upstream sources.

As of this writing, at least 192 species of fishes representing 42 families have been introduced to Florida (Exhibit 2).  Nearly all waterbodies are affected by fish introductions, from small wetlands to the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of Florida.  The list below contains the species known to have been introduced, although it is important to note that new species are introduced on a regular basis in Florida, so the list is constantly expanding.  Many species ultimately fail to gain a foothold in Florida, while a smaller number of species successfully establish themselves.  Some have spread like a cancer across the state.  The Brown Hoplo (Hoplosternum littorale) is an example of an introduction that is now established throughout the peninsula of Florida, much to the detriment of native aquatic species that have not had time to adapt to this new competitor for limited resources.  Marine habitats are not immune to biological invasions.  The detrimental effects of the (likely intentional) introduction of two species of invasive lionfishes (Red Lionfish and Devil Firefish [Pterois volitans and P. miles]) are still being determined but likely include direct predation on native fishes, crabs, and shrimps and competition with native reef species for limited resources.  Red Lionfish and Devil Firefish are now firmly established throughout the Atlantic coast of Florida and are actively invading much of the Gulf of Mexico.  The spread of lionfishes throughout the western North Atlantic Ocean is occurring at an unprecedented rate (see Exhibit 3) (Schofield 2010).  Many of the introduced fishes in Florida are from tropical or subtropical areas of Asia and South America, and to a lesser extent, Africa (Idelberger et al. 2010).  The fact that Florida’s climate is also subtropical is a major reason why many introduced species have successfully established themselves in the state. 

It should go without saying that the intentional introduction of any nonindigenous species, whether it be a plant or animal and regardless of size or assumed innocuousness, should never be attempted.  The reasons are many and the costs can be severe, both in terms of biological effects and economic impacts.  Nonindigenous species introduced to new areas have the capacity to explode in numbers and outcompete native species for limited resources such as food, water, and shelter.  Native species are at a competitive disadvantage because they have not had time to evolve defense mechanisms that would otherwise allow them to successfully compete against the introduced species.  The competition between native and nonindigenous species can result in the extinction of native species, the spread of diseases and parasites, and the displacement of whole communities, and may even cause physical changes to the environment. 

Exhibit 2.  Freshwater and marine nonindigenous fishes recorded from Florida.

Scientific Name

Common Name

Locality Records

Current Status

ACANTHURIDAE

SURGEONFISHES

 

 

Acanthurus guttatus

Whitespotted Surgeonfish

Atlantic Ocean off Palm Beach County

Unknown, not likely to be established

Acanthurus pyroferus

Chocolate Surgeonfish

Atlantic Ocean off Palm Beach County

Unknown, not likely to be established

Acanthurus sohal

Red Sea Surgeonfish

Atlantic Ocean off Broward County

Unknown, not likely to be established

Naso lituratus

Orangespine Unicornfish

Atlantic Ocean off Palm Beach County

Unknown, not likely to be established

Zebrasoma desjardinii

Sailfin Tang

Atlantic Ocean off Broward County

Unknown, not likely to be established

Zebrasoma flavescens

Yellow Tang

Atlantic Ocean off Broward, Monroe, & Palm Beach counties

Established off Monroe County, unknown elsewhere

Zebrasoma scopas

Brown Tang

Atlantic Ocean off Broward County

Unknown, not likely to be established

Zebrasoma veliferum

Sailfin Tang

Atlantic Ocean off Monroe & Palm Beach counties

Unknown

Zebrasoma xanthurum

Yellowtail Tang

Atlantic Ocean off Palm Beach County

Unknown

ANABANTIDAE

CLIMBING GOURAMIES

 

 

Anabas testudineus

Climbing Perch

Manatee County

Extirpated

Ctenopoma nigropannosum

Twospot Climbing Perch

Manatee County

Extirpated

ANOSTOMIDAE

HEADSTANDERS

 

 

Leporinus fasciatus

Banded Leporinus

Miami-Dade County

Failed

BALISTIDAE

TRIGGERFISHES

   

Balistoides conspicillum

Clown Triggerfish

Atlantic Ocean off Palm Beach County

Unknown, not likely to be established

Rhinecanthus aculeatus

Lagoon Triggerfish

Atlantic Ocean off Palm Beach County

Unknown, not likely to be established

Rhinecanthus verrucosus

Bursa Triggerfish

Atlantic Ocean off Palm Beach County

Unknown, not likely to be established

BLENNIIDAE

BLENNIES

 

 

Hypsoblennius invemar

Tessellated Blenny

Atlantic and Gulf coasts off Bay, Broward, Lee, Miami-Dade, Monroe, & Palm Beach counties

Established

CALLICHTHYIDAE

ARMORED CATFISHES

 

 

Callichthys callichthys

Cascarudo

Palm Beach County, Boca Raton

Failed

Corydoras sp.

Corydoras

Miami-Dade County, elsewhere

Failed

Hoplosternum littorale

Brown Hoplo

Most of peninsular Florida

Established

CENTRARCHIDAE

SUNFISHES

 

 

Ambloplites rupestris

Rock Bass

Jackson, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, & Walton counties

Established

CHAETODONTIDAE

BUTTERFLYFISHES

 

 

Chaetodon lunula

Raccoon Butterflyfish

Atlantic Ocean off Broward & Palm Beach counties

Unknown

Heniochus diphreutes

Schooling Bannerfish

Atlantic Ocean off Broward County

Unknown, not likely to be established

Heniochus intermedius

Red Sea Bannerfish

Atlantic Ocean off Palm Beach County

Unknown, not likely to be established

Heniochus sp.

Bannerfish

Atlantic Ocean off Palm Beach County

Unknown

CHANNIDAE

SNAKEHEADS

 

 

Channa argus

Northern Snakehead

Seminole & Volusia counties

Failed

Channa marulius

Bullseye Snakehead

Broward County

Established

CHARACIDAE

TETRAS

 

 

Aphyocharax anisitsi

Bloodfin Tetra

Hillsborough County

Failed

Colossoma macropomum

Tambaqui

Alachua, Bay, Broward, Leon, Pinellas, St. Lucie & Volusia counties

Failed

Colossoma or Piaractus sp.

Unidentified Pacu

Alachua, Broward, Citrus, DeSoto, Duval, Escambia, Holmes, Indian River, Marion, Miami-Dade, Pinellas, & Volusia counties

Failed

Gymnocorymbus ternetzi

Black Tetra

Hillsborough County

Failed

Hyphessobrycon eques

Serpae Tetra

Bay County

Failed

Metynnis sp.

Metynnis

Collier & Martin counties, elsewhere

Established (Martin Co.)

Failed (Collier Co.)

Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae

Redeye Tetra

Hillsborough County

Failed

Piaractus brachypomus

Pirapatinga, Red-Bellied Pacu

Alachua, Brevard, DeSoto, Hillsborough, Martin, Monroe, Orange, Osceola, Polk, Sarasota, St. Lucie, & Walton counties

Unknown (Monroe Co.)

Failed (all other counties)

Piaractus mesopotamicus

Small-Scaled Pacu

Lee County

Failed

Pygocentrus nattereri

Red Piranha

Miami-Dade & Palm Beach counties

Failed (Miami-Dade Co.)

Eradicated (Palm-Beach Co.)

Pygocentrus or Serrasalmus sp.

Unidentified Piranha

Florida (not specified)

Collected

Serrasalmus rhombeus

White Piranha

Alachua & Miami-Dade counties, elsewhere

Eradicated to failed

CICHLIDAE

CICHLIDS

 

 

Aequidens pulcher

Blue Acara

Hillsborough County

Extirpated

Amphilophus citrinellus

Midas Cichlid

Alachua, Broward, Hillsborough, & Miami-Dade counties

Failed (Alachua Co.)

Established (elsewhere)

Archocentrus nigrofasciatus

Convict Cichlid

Alachua & Miami-Dade counties, elsewhere

Failed or eradicated throughout

Astatotilapia calliptera

Eastern Happy

Broward & Palm Beach counties

Established (both counties)

Astronotus ocellatus

Oscar

Much of southern FL

Established

Cichla ocellaris

Butterfly Peacock Bass

Much of southern FL

Established

Cichla temensis

Speckled Pavon

Palm Beach County, elsewhere in southern FL

Failed

Cichlasoma bimaculatum

Black Acara

Much of southern FL

Established

Cichlasoma octofasciata

Jack Dempsey

Alachua, Brevard, Broward, Hillsborough, Indian River, Levy, Manatee, & Palm Beach counties

Established (most counties)

Cichlasoma salvini

Yellowbelly Cichlid

Broward & Miami-Dade counties

Established

Cichlasoma trimaculatum

Threespot Cichlid

Hillsborough & Manatee counties

Failed (Hillsborough Co.)

Extirpated (Manatee Co.)

Cichlasoma urophthalmus

Mayan Cichlid

Much of southern Florida

Established

Geophagus sp.

Eartheater

Miami-Dade County

Failed

Hemichromis letourneuxi

African Jewelfish

Much of southern Florida

Established

Herichthys cyanoguttatum

Rio Grande Cichlid

Brevard, Hillsborough, Lee, Miami-Dade, Monroe, Pinellas, & Polk counties

Established

Heros severus

Banded Cichlid

Broward & Miami-Dade counties

Established

Melanochromis auratus

Golden Mbuna

Hillsborough County

Unknown

Oreochromis aureus

Blue Tilapia

Much of peninsular FL

Established

Oreochromis mossambicus

Mozambique Tilapia

Much of peninsular FL

Established

Oreochromis niloticus

Nile Tilapia

Alachua, Brevard, Gadsden, Hardee, Hendry, Highlands, Jackson, Osceola, Putnam, & Sarasota counties

Established (Alachua Co.)

Unknown (elsewhere)

Oreochromis sp.

Tilapia Species

Brevard County

Unknown

Oreochromis, Sarotherodon, Tilapia sp.

Tilapia

Glades County, elsewhere

Collected

Parachromis managuensis

Jaguar Guapote

Much of southern FL

Established

Pseudotropheus socolofi

Pindani

Miami-Dade County

Extirpated

Pterophyllum scalare

Freshwater Angelfish

Palm Beach County

Failed

Sarotherodon melanotheron

Blackchin Tilapia

Much of southern FL

Established

Telmatochromis bifrenatus

Lake Tanganyika Dwarf Cichlid

Oklawaha County

Failed

Thorichthys meeki

Firemouth Cichlid

Brevard, Broward, Hillsborough, Miami-Dade, Monroe, Miami-Dade, & Palm Beach counties

Established (Broward Co.)

Failed or extirpated (elsewhere)

Tilapia buttikoferi

Zebra Tilapia

Miami-Dade County

Established

Tilapia mariae

Spotted Tilapia

Much of southern FL

Established

Tilapia sp.

Unidentified Tilapia

Brevard County

Established

Tilapia sparrmanii

Banded Tilapia

Hillsborough County, elsewhere

Failed

Tilapia zillii

Redbelly Tilapia

Brevard, Lake, Miami-Dade, & Polk counties

Established (Brevard & Miami-Dade Co.)

Extirpated or failed (elsewhere)

CLARIIDAE

LABYRINTH CATFISHES

 

 

Clarias batrachus

Walking Catfish

Much of southern FL

Established

COBITIDAE

LOACHES

 

 

Misgurnus anguillicaudatus

Oriental Weatherfish

Much of southern FL

Established

Pangio kuhlii

Coolie Loach

Hillsborough County

Failed

CYPRINIDAE

CARPS AND MINNOWS

 

 

Barbonymus schwanenfeldii

Tinfoil Barb

Palm Beach County, elsewhere

Failed

Carassius auratus

Goldfish

Alachua, Clay, Miami-Dade, & Putnam counties

Unknown

Ctenopharyngodon idella

Grass Carp

Throughout FL

Stocked as triploid, no evidence of establishment

Cyprinus carpio

Common Carp

Much of northern FL

Established

Danio rerio

Zebra Danio

Hillsborough & Palm Beach counties

Failed

Devario malabaricus

Malabar Danio

Hillsborough & Miami-Dade counties, elsewhere

Failed

Hybopsis cf. winchelli

Undescribed Clear Chub

Gadsden County

Failed

Hypophthalmichthys nobilis

 

Bighead Carp

Bay & Palm Beach counties

Failed

Labeo chrysophekadion

Black Sharkminnow, Black Labeo

Not specified

Failed

Leuciscus idus

Ide

Not specified

Failed

Luxilus chrysocephalus isolepis

Striped Shiner

Escambia & Santa Rosa counties

Established

Nocomis leptocephalus bellicus

Bluehead Chub

Escambia & Santa Rosa counties

Established

Notemigonus crysoleucas

Golden Shiner

Ochlocknee drainage

Established

Notropis baileyi

Rough Shiner

Escambia & Santa Rosa counties

Established

Notropis harperi

Redeye Chub

Leon County

Failed

Pethia conchonius

Rosy Barb

Palm Beach County, elsewhere

Failed

Pethia gelius

Dwarf Barb

Palm Beach County, elsewhere

Failed

Pimephales promelas

Fathead Minnow

Hillsborough, Leon, Marion, Palm Beach, & Polk counties

Unknown or extirpated throughout

Systomus tetrazona

Tiger Barb

Miami-Dade County, elsewhere

Failed

Tinca tinca

Tench

Unspecified

Failed

DORADIDAE

THORNY CATFISHES

 

 

Oxydoras niger

Ripsaw Catfish

Miami-Dade County

Failed

Platydoras costatus

Raphael Catfish

Unspecified

Collected

Pterodoras granulosus

Granulated Catfish

Pinellas County

Failed

Pterodoras sp.

Thorny Catfish

Pinellas County

Failed

Platax orbicularis

Orbiculate Batfish

Broward, Lee, Miami-Dade, Monroe, & Palm Beach counties

Eradicated to unknown

ERYTHRINIDAE

TRAHIRAS

 

 

Hoplias malabaricus

Trahira

Hillsborough County

Eradicated

GRAMMATIDAE

BASSLETS

 

 

Gramma loreto

Fairy Basslet

Atlantic Ocean off Broward, Monroe, Palm Beach, & Duval counties; also in Gulf of Mexico (unspecified counties)

Established (throughout)

HELOSTOMATIDAE

KISSING GOURAMIES

 

 

Helostoma temminkii

Kissing Gourami

Hillsborough & Palm Beach counties

Failed

HEMISCYLLIIDAE

BAMBOOSHARKS

 

 

Chiloscyllium punctatum

Brownbanded Bambooshark

Atlantic Ocean off Palm Beach County

Unknown, not likely to be established

HEPTAPTERIDAE

SEVEN-FINNED CATFISHES

 

 

Rhamdia quelen

Bagre

Miami-Dade County

Failed

Rhamdia sp.

Bagre De Rio

Miami-Dade County

Unknown

ICTALURIDAE

NORTH AMERICAN CATFISHES

 

 

Ictalurus furcatus

Blue Catfish

Calhoun, Escambia, Gilchrist, Okaloosa, & Washington counties, elsewhere in northern FL

Established (most of area)

Failed (Okaloosa Co.)

Unknown (Washington Co.)

Pylodictis olivaris

Flathead Catfish

Calhoun, Escambia, Liberty, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Walton, & Washington counties, elsewhere in northern FL

Established (several areas)

Failed or unknown elsewhere

LORICARIIDAE

SUCKERMOUTH ARMORED CATFISHES

 

 

Ancistrus sp.

Bristlenosed Catfish

Miami-Dade County

Established

Farlowella vittata

Twig Catfish

Hillsborough County

Unknown

Glyptoperichthys gibbiceps

Leopard Pleco

Alachua County

Unknown

Hypostomus plecostomus

Suckermouth Catfish

Broward, DeSota, Hillsborough, Miami-Dade, & Polk counties

Established (most of area)

Unknown (Hillsborough Co.)

Hypostomus sp.

Suckermouth Catfish

Hillsborough, Martin, Miami-Dade, Palm Beach, Pinellas, & Seminole counties, elsewhere

Established (throughout)

Pterygoplichthys anisitsi

Paraná Sailfin Catfish

Brevard, Marion, Okeechobee, & St. Johns counties

Established

Pterygoplichthys disjunctivus

Vermiculated Sailfin Catfish

Much of southern FL

Established

Pterygoplichthys multiradiatus

Orinoco Sailfin Catfish

Much of southern FL

Established

Pterygoplichthys pardalis

Amazon Sailfin Catfish

DeSota, Glades, Hardee, Hillsborough, Lee, Miami-Dade, Okeechobee, Palm Beach, Sarasota, & St. Lucie counties

Established

Pterygoplichthys sp.

Sailfin Catfish

Much of central and southern FL

Established (much of area)

MASTACEMBELIDAE

FRESHWATER SPINY EELS

 

 

Macrognathus siamensis

Spotfin Spiny Eel

Miami-Dade & Monroe counties

Established (throughout)

MORONIDAE

TEMPERATE BASSES

 

 

Morone chrysops

White Bass

Much of peninsular FL

Established

Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis

Sunshine Bass

Much of northern and central FL

Stocked

Morone saxatilis

Striped Bass

Gadsden, Hernando, Lake, Martin, Orange, Polk, & Walton counties

Established (Gadsden, Hernando, Polk, & Walton counties)

Failed, extirpated, or collected (elsewhere)

NOTOPTERIDAE

FEATHERFIN KNIFEFISHES

 

 

Chitala ornata

Clown Knifefish

Lake, Palm Beach, & Pinellas counties

Failed (Lake & Pinellas Co.)

Established (Palm Beach Co.)

OSPHRONEMIDAE

GOURAMIES

 

 

Betta splendens

Siamese Fighting Fish

Manatee & Palm Beach counties, elsewhere

Failed (throughout)

Colisa fasciata

Banded Gourami

Not specified

Failed

Colisa labiosa

Thicklipped Gourami

Hillsborough County

Failed

Colisa lalia

Dwarf Gourami

Hillsborough & Palm Beach counties

Failed

Macropodus opercularis

Paradise Fish

Palm Beach County

Failed

Osphronemus goramy

Giant Gourami

Not specified

Collected

Trichogaster leerii

Pearl Gourami

Palm Beach County

Failed

Trichogaster trichopterus

Three-Spot Gourami

Miami-Dade & Palm Beach counties

Failed

Trichopsis vittata

Croaking Gourami

Palm Beach County

Established

OSTEOGLOSSIDAE

AROWANAS

 

 

Osteoglossum bicirrhosum

Silver Arowana

Broward, Monroe, & Osceola counties

Failed

PANGASIIDAE

SHARK CATFISHES

 

 

Pangasianodon hypophthalmus

Iridescent Shark

Hillsborough County, elsewhere

Failed

PERCIDAE

PERCHES AND DARTERS

 

 

Perca flavescens

Yellow Perch

Gadsden & Liberty counties, Apalachicola drainage

Established

Sander canadensis

Sauger

Gadsden County

Established

Sander vitreus

Walleye

Orange County

Failed

PIMELODIDAE

LONG-WHISKERED CATFISHES

 

 

Leiarius marmoratus

(no common name)

Miami-Dade County

Unknown

Phractocephalus hemioliopterus

Redtail Catfish

Bay County, elsewhere

Failed

POECILIIDAE

LIVEBEARERS

 

 

Belonesox belizanus

Pike Killifish

Much of southern FL

Established (throughout)

Gambusia affinis

Western Mosquitofish

Alachua County

Failed

Poecilia kykesis

Péten Molly

Hillsborough & Palm Beach counties

Failed

Poecilia latipunctata

Tamesí Molly

Hillsborough County

Failed

Poecilia reticulata

Guppy

Alachua, Brevard, Hillsborough, & Palm Beach counties

Unknown (Alachua Co.)

Failed (Brevard Co.)

Extirpated (Hillsborough & Palm Beach Co.)

Poecilia sphenops

Mexican Molly

Not specified

Failed

Xiphophorus hellerii

Green Swordtail

Brevard, Hillsborough, Indian River, Manatee, Palm Beach, Polk, & St. Johns counties

Established (throughout)

Xiphophorus hellerii x X. maculatus

Red Swordtail

Brevard & Hillsborough counties

Established

Xiphophorus hellerii x X. variatus

Platyfish/Swordtail

Not specified

Locally established

Xiphophorus maculatus

Southern Platyfish

Alachua, Brevard, Hillsborough, Indian River, Manatee, Palm Beach, & St. Lucie counties

Established (throughout except Indian River & Manatee Co.)

Unknown (Indian River & Manatee Co.)

Xiphophorus sp.

Platyfish

Brevard & Hillsborough counties

Unknown (Brevard Co.)

Established (Hillsborough Co.)

Xiphophorus variatus

Variable Platyfish

Alachua, Brevard,  Hillsborough, Manatee, Marian, Miami-Dade, & Palm Beach counties

Established (throughout)

Xiphophorus xiphidium

Swordtail Platyfish

Not specified

Collected

POLYODONTIDAE

PADDLEFISHES

 

 

Polyodon spathula

Paddlefish

Jackson County & Apalachicola River

Failed

POLYPTERIDAE

BICHIRS

 

 

Polypterus delhezi

Barred Bichir

Broward County

Failed

POMACANTHIDAE

ANGELFISHES

 

 

Pomacanthus annularis

Blue Ringed Angelfish

Broward County

Unknown

Pomacanthus asfur

Arabian Angel

Broward County

Unknown

Pomacanthus imperator

Emperor Angelfish

Broward & Miami-Dade counties

Unknown

Pomacanthus maculosus

Yellowbar Angelfish

Broward & Palm Beach counties

Unknown

Pomacanthus semicirculatus

Semicircle Angelfish

Broward & Palm Beach counties

Unknown

Pomacanthus xanthometopon

Bluefaced Angel

Broward County

Unknown

POMACENTRIDAE

DAMSELFISHES

 

 

Dascyllus aruanus

Whitetail Damselfish

Palm Beach County

Eradicated

Dascyllus trimaculatus

Three Spot Damselfish

Palm Beach County

Unknown

Salmonidae

Salmon and Trout

 

 

Oncorhynchus mykiss

Rainbow Trout

Okaloosa & Walton counties

Stocked (1968)

Salmo trutta

Brown Trout

Not specified

Failed

SCATOPHAGIDAE

SCATS

 

 

Scatophagus argus

Scat

Levy & Martin counties

Collected

SCORPAENIDAE

SCORPIONFISHES

 

 

Pterois volitans &

P. miles (combined here due to morphological similarity)

Red Lionfish &

Devil Firefish

Throughout much of the Atlantic coast of Florida, nearshore to at least 60 miles offshore, less commonly encountered along the Gulf coast

Established (Atlantic coast)

Likely established (Gulf coast [see Schofeild 2010 for more info.])

Serranidae

Sea Basses

 

 

Cephalopholis argus

Peacock Hind

Broward, Monroe, & Palm Beach counties

Unknown

Chromileptes altivelis

Panther Grouper

Brevard, Broward, Palm Beach, & Pinellas counties

Unknown

Epinephelus ongus

White-Streaked Grouper

Palm Beach County

Unknown

SYNBRANCHIDAE

SWAMP EELS

 

 

Monopterus albus

Asian Swamp Eel

Hillsborough, Manatee, & Miami-Dade counties

Established (throughout)

TETRAODONTIDAE

PUFFERS

 

 

Arothron diadematus

Masked Pufferfish

Palm Beach County

Failed

ZANCLIDAE

MOORISH IDOLS

 

 

Zanclus cornutus

Moorish Idol

Monroe & Palm Beach counties

Unknown

Sources: Schofield (2010), USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species online database (http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/SpeciesList.aspx?group=Fishes&state=FL&Sortby=1)

Exhibit 3 of JCS Introduced Fishes Writeup 012815

Below is a link to an interactive map showing the spread of the Red Lionfish and the Devil Firefish in the western North Atlantic from the 1980s to 2013:

http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/FactSheets/LionfishAnimation.aspx

Sources:

Adams, C.R. and N.M. Steigerwalt.  2010.  Research Needs and Logistic Impediments in Restoration, Enhancement, and Management Projects: A Survey of Land Managers. Publication ENH1161 [online resource]. Environmental Horticulture Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Accessed 11/21/10 at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep423.

Didham, R.H., J.M. Tylianakis, M.A. Hutchison, R.M. Ewers, and N.J. Gemmell. 2005. Are invasive species the drivers of ecological change? Trends in Ecology and Evolution 20(9):470–474.

Elton, C.S. 1958. The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants. Methuen and Co., Ltd., Strand, London.

Idelberger, C.F., C.J. Stafford, and S.E. Erickson.  2011.  Distribution and abundance of introduced fishes in Florida’s Charlotte Harbor estuary.  Gulf and Caribbean Research 23:13–22.

Sala, O.E. F.S. Chapin, J.J. Armesto, E. Berlow, J. Bloomfield, R. Dirzo, E. Huber-Sanwald, L.F. Huenneke, R.B. Jackson, A. Kinzig, R. Leemans, D.M. Lodge, H.A. Mooney, M. Oesterheld, N.L. Poff, M.T. Sykes, B.H. Walker, M. Walker, and D.H. Wall. 2000. Global biodiversity scenarios for the year 2100. Science 287:1770–1774.

Schofield, P.J.  2010. Update on geographic spread of invasive lionfishes (Pterois volitans [Linnaeus, 1758] and P. miles [Bennett, 1928]) in the western North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. Aquatic Invasions 5, Supplement 1:S117–S122.  http://www.aquaticinvasions.net/2010/Supplement/AI_2010_5_S1_Schofield

U.S. Geological Survey.  2015. NAS – Nonindigenous Aquatic Species [online resource].  Accessed 01/23/15 at http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/CollectionInfo.aspx?SpeciesID=963&State=FL.

Villazon, K.A. 2009. Methods to Restore Native Plant Communities after Invasive Species Removal: Marl Prairie Ponds and an Abandoned Phosphate Mine in Florida. MS thesis, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

Vitousek, P.M., C.M. D’Antonio, L.L. Loope, and R. Westbrooks. 1996. Biological invasions as global environmental change. American Scientist 84:468–478.

Vitousek, P.M., H.A. Mooney, J. Lubchenco, and J.M. Melillo. 1997. Human domination of Earth’s ecosystem. Science 277:494–499.

Wilcove, D.S., D. Rothstein, J. Dubow, A. Phillips, and E. Losos.  1998.  Quantifying threats to imperiled species in the United States. Bioscience 48:607–615.

 

 

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Sediment Sampling: What Is a PONAR Grab Sampler?

 

The PONAR grab sampler is the main bottom sampling device used on vessels to study the composition of the bottom sediments of a lake or river.  The grab sampler provides a means to obtain a somewhat quantitative and undisturbed sample of the bottom material. It takes a bite of known surface area and penetration depth, provided that the bottom material is neither too hard or nor too soft. It is called a grab sampler because of the manner in which it obtains samples.

Early studies on Lake Michigan used oceanographic and freshwater grab samplers that were not satisfactory. Research scientists from the Great Lakes Research Division of the University of Michigan devised a new sampler, the PONAR grab sampler, that was first available for sale in 1966. The sampler is named after Great Lakes scientists, Charles E. Powers, Robert A. Ogle, Jr., Vincent E. Noble, John C. Ayers, and Andrew Robertson.

The PONAR grab sampler consists of two opposing semi-circular jaws that are normally held open by a trigger mechanism. The sampler is lowered to the bottom where contact with the bottom sets off the trigger and a strong spring snaps the jaws shut trapping a sample of the bottom inside. Fine copper screen covers the top of the jaws so that the trapped material will not wash out as the sampler is retrieved.

For the full article, including a description of how the bottom material is studied, go to http://www.gvsu.edu/wri/education/instructors-manual-bottom-sampling-31.htm.  

Source:  Excerpted from the Instructor’s Manual on Bottom Sampling and used with permission from Annis Water Resources Institute (AWRI).  www.gvsu.edu/wri/education

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Expansion of the Jacksonville Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site Is Finalized

USACE Jacksonville and EPA Region 4 identified the need to either designate another Jacksonville ODMDS or expand the current 1‑square nautical mile (nmi2) site. ANAMAR was contracted in 2009 to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for this multi-year, multi-faceted site designation project. Congratulations to all the people who worked on this project! The final rule will go into effect on November 13 designating the new 4.56‑nmi2 area.

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NOAA Holds Public Comment Period for a Proposed Rule That Will Enforce Marine Mammal Protection from International Fisheries Exporting into the U.S.

NOAA Holds Public Comment Period for a Proposed Rule That Will Enforce Marine Mammal Protection from International Fisheries Exporting into the U.S.

 

NOAA’s proposed rule will require foreign fisheries that export fish and fish products into the United States to comply with U.S. marine mammal conservation standards and regulations. These fisheries can choose to adopt presently established U.S. regulatory programs and fishing methods or they can choose to establish other programs and fishing methods that will be equally as effective as compliance with U.S. standards. In a 2005 report, the U.S. Ocean Commission estimated that the worldwide bycatch rate of marine mammals is more than 600,000 a year. The implementation and enforcement of this rule have the potential to be a significant ‘game changer’ in the fishing industry.

According to the 2014 NOAA Fisheries report, the U.S. (including all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) imported $20.2 billion of edible fishery products and $15.6 billion of inedible fishery products, creating a combined $35.9 billion industry. During 1999, the combined imported edible and inedible fishery products were valued at $17 billion.

NOAA Fisheries. Current Fishery Statistics NO. 2014-2: Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2014 Revised.

Available at http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/Assets/commercial/trade/Trade2014.pdf

Check out the Federal Register to read the complete proposed rule. The comment period will close November 9, 2015.

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2014 Mouth of the Columbia River Deep Water Site and Shallow Water Site Monitoring Series, Part 3 of 4: Epifaunal Trawls

Part 3 of our Oregon adventure series describes the epifaunal trawl sampling efforts that were part of the June and October surveys.  During the two surveys, the team conducted four 10‑minute trawl tows at each of three drop zones inside the DWS for a total of 12 trawl tows.

The objective of the study is to characterize the epifaunal community (both invertebrates and fishes) at drop zones within the DWS, including a comparison of taxonomic richness and diversity between zones and with previous monitoring survey results. 

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Getting ready to deploy the trawl.

 

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Deploying the trawl.

 

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Sorting the catch.

 

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A Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) from a trawl catch. Some of the scales have rubbed off. Note the orange-yellow spots.

 

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Egg capsule of the big skate (Raja binoculata) from the trawl catch. This one measured 256 mm, which is rather large for skates in general but is only average size for the aptly-named big skate.

 

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This spotted ratfish (Hydrolagus collier) and smelt (Osmeridae) from a trawl catch were measured and released.

 

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A staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus) being measured.

 

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Boney fishes were measured as standard length (from tip of nose to end of vertebral column).

 

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A scallop shell was part of a trawl catch.

 

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A small octupus was caught during trawling. It was recorded and released.

 

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This large sea anemone retracted its tentacles following capture in a trawl.

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ANAMAR’s Work in Charleston Harbor Profiled in "Dredging Today"

ANAMAR’s Work in Charleston Harbor Profiled in "Dredging Today"

(Pictured above is the cooper marl we frequently encountered while collecting core samples)

The Charleston Harbor Federal Navigation Channel covers an area of approximately 14 square miles and is formed by the confluence of the Ashley, Cooper, and Wando rivers. Maritime interests want the harbor channel deepened beyond 45 feet so the Port of Charleston can handle the larger container ships that will routinely call when the expanded Panama Canal opens in 2015. In response to this need to accommodate larger ships and increasing ship traffic, a feasibility study is being conducted for the Charleston Harbor Navigation Improvement Project to analyze and evaluate improvements to Charleston Harbor. The Post-45 feasibility study examines the economic benefits and environmental impacts of the deepening project and determines what depth would be recommended for construction. ANAMAR was contracted to conduct sediment evaluations to determine if the proposed dredge material is suitable for disposal in the Charleston Harbor ocean dredged material disposal site (ODMDS) and to help identify potential beneficial uses for dredged material such as habitat development, shore protection, or beach nourishment.

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ANAMAR managed all sampling operations and worked closely with subcontractors to coordinate logistics. The sampling plan included collection of vibracore samples at 105 sites, plus grab samples at the reference station, and site water samples at three locations for elutriate preparation. Due to the size of the project, the sampling effort took nearly 4 weeks to complete and presented some unique challenges. Inclement weather caused by Tropical Storm Sandy followed 2 days later by a winter storm resulted in minor delays in sampling operations. This area also experiences six-foot tidal fluctuations resulting in very strong currents during incoming and outgoing tides; therefore, the sampling team had to plan daily sampling operations during workable currents (i.e., slack tides). Since sampling was taking place within the shipping channel and berthing areas, the captain maintained regular communication with the ships so that sampling would not interfere with shipping traffic. The physical composition of the sediment itself also proved to be challenging. Most of the sediment in the areas of interest was highly consolidated Cooper Marl, which was difficult to penetrate and to remove from the core barrel. A method was developed in the field to pressurize the core barrel using compressed air to extrude sample material from the barrel. This “on-the-fly” innovation helped the field effort stay on schedule.

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Coordinating sample delivery with the chemistry and bioassay laboratories to meet holding times while field operations were ongoing required multiple sample shipments due to holding times and the amount of time required to collect all the samples. It was necessary to run the bioaccumulation tests in two batches due to holding times and the laboratory space required for such a large number of samples. Close coordination with the laboratories and couriers was critical.

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ANAMAR succeeded in collecting all the required sample material and processed and shipped the material to the laboratories within holding times. ANAMAR reviewed and evaluated all the laboratory data and produced a report summarizing the results of the physical, chemical, and toxicological analysis of sediment, elutriate, water, and tissue samples of the proposed dredge material collected from the project area.

Below is a quotation from the news article: Dredging Today (July 2, 2015) "Post 45 Project Gets Funding"

"The Charleston Harbor Post 45 Deepening Project is the first project in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to go through the Corps’ new Civil Works Planning Process from start to finish.

This has enabled the Charleston District to reduce the initial study timeline of five to eight years down to less than four years, and reduce the initial study budget from $20 million to less than $12 million dollars. This project will serve as a model for Corps civil works projects around the world."

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Bryde’s Whales in the Gulf of Mexico May Receive Endangered Species Protection

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Getting to Know the Bryde’s Whale

The Bryde’s whale (Balaenoptera edeni) is a tropical member of the baleen family and can be found around the globe between 40°N and 40°S. The Bryde’s whale is represented by two subspecies that live in different regions: Balaenoptera edeni are found in the Western Pacific, coasts of Asia, and possibly Australia, and the Balaenoptera brydei are found in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans and in coastal South Africa. The last abundance survey performed in the Gulf of Mexico was in 2009 and found only 33 remaining Bryde’s whales.

Bryde’s Whale Protection Movement

In September 2014, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) filed a petition to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) requesting that the Gulf of Mexico population of the Bryde’s whale be listed as ‘endangered’ under the Endangered Species Act.  During the first week of April 2015, NMFS stated that there is sufficient scientific evidence to consider granting protected status and has announced the start of a 90-day findings petition to solicit any additional information from interested parties.

Current Protections

Currently, the Bryde’s whale is protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), which prohibits (with certain exceptions)

  • The “take” of marine mammals in U.S. waters and by U.S. citizens on the high seas
  • The importation of marine mammals and marine mammal products into the U.S.

Increased Protections

If the Bryde’s whale becomes listed as endangered, the species would receive much more protection, including.

  • designations of critical habitats
  • recovery plans
  • initiatives such as grants for state conservation efforts
  • increased co-operations internationally and in the private sector and potential funding for authorized research

Federal Register 90-Day Finding Document

NOAA Fisheries; Office of Protected Resources: Bryde's Whale

 

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Public Forum for Land and Water Conservation Pertaining to Florida’s Amendment 1 to Be Held This Thursday

Public Forum for Land and Water Conservation Pertaining to Florida’s Amendment 1 to Be Held This Thursday

The Gainesville Sun will be holding a forum to discuss land and water conservation and other topics.  More information as quoted from The Gainesville Sun follows.

The Gainesville Sun is holding a forum on land and water conservation, including a discussion of how state lawmakers are planning to spend Amendment 1 money.

The forum will be held March 19 at 7 p.m. at the University of Florida’s Pugh Hall. The event and parking are free and open to the public.

The event will include a panel discussion featuring Ramesh Buch, who manages the Alachua County Forever land conservation program; Greg Galpin, a Plum Creek Timber Company official who has worked on local conservation easements; Pegeen Hanrahan, former Gainesville mayor and deputy director of the Amendment 1 campaign; and Charlie Houder, who spent 28 years in public land acquisition and management with the Suwannee and St. Johns River water management districts. Sun editorial page editor Nathan Crabbe will moderate the discussion.

Suggested questions may be sent to him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. There will also be an opportunity for audience questions at the event. The event is being sponsored by The Gainesville Sun and UF's Bob Graham Center for Public Service. It will be streamed live at http://www.bobgrahamcenter.ufl.edu.”

Photo above taken on the Silver River in Ocala Florida courtesy of www.wikimediacommons.com.

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EPA Proposes 90 Day Public Comment Period Concerning Revisions to the National Contingency Plan; Subpart J which Allows the Use of Oil-Dispersing Agents during Oil Spills

EPA Proposes 90 Day Public Comment Period Concerning Revisions to the National Contingency Plan; Subpart J which Allows the Use of Oil-Dispersing Agents during Oil Spills

 

On January 22, 2015, EPA released proposed revisions to the National Contingency Plan; specifically Subpart J (Product Schedule) which governs the use of spill-mitigating substances (including dispersants and other biological and chemical agents) in response to oil discharged into navigable U.S. waters. The agency’s proposal adds new criteria to the NCP Product Schedule, revises toxic testing protocols; amends requirements for authority notifications, monitoring, and data reporting; and clarifies the evaluations needed to remove products from the schedule. The last revision to the National Contingency Plan occurred in response to the passage of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. To learn more, check out the Subpart J Proposed Rule Summary.

Public comments will be accepted only through the official docket: EPA-HA-OPA-2006-0090.

Photo above courtesy of NASA's Tara Satellites. The photo was taken on May 24, 2010 of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

 

 

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Dredging Today Featured a Video from Jacksonville Port Authorities; “Building a Better Future: Deepening the St. Johns”

Dredging Today Featured a Video from Jacksonville Port Authorities; “Building a Better Future: Deepening the St. Johns”

The Jacksonville Port Authority (JAXPORT) has created a video explaining exactly what ‘all the hype’ is about in America’s ports today. The video is geared specifically towards JAXPORT, but you can easily imagine how this could affect all U.S. ports. First and foremost, think of ongoing improvements to the Panama Canal: an additional set of locks (creating room for more ships to enter and exit the canal) and an increased ship size, or PANAMAX vessels. Now envision how it’s in America’s best interest to allow these larger ships to enter our ports. ANAMAR is honored to be involved in many of the necessary sampling efforts in major U.S. ports in preparation for handling the PANAMAX ships, and we are excited to watch the growth that’s occurring in our ports.  Check out the video to learn exactly what ‘all the hype’ is about! 

 

 

 

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Florida FWC Is Offering a No-Cost Gulf Reef Fish Anglers License in Trade for Information Concerning Certain Catch Species

Florida FWC Is Offering a No-Cost Gulf Reef Fish Anglers License in Trade for Information Concerning Certain Catch Species

 

FWC has moved forward in trying to obtain more data concerning certain Gulf reef fish by offering a no-cost Gulf Reef Anglers fishing license in trade for information concerning certain species. Through this program FWC will be able to contact Gulf Reef Fish Anglers and gather information concerning their catch in order to gain a better understanding of what is happening below the water’s surface.

If you are interested in obtaining one of these no-cost licenses, simply follow the instructions and complete the online Gulf Reef Fish Angler's License Form before April 1, 2015. After April 1, this license will be mandatory for all anglers who are fishing from a private boat off Florida’s Gulf coast (excluding Monroe County) with intentions to harvest or possess one or more of the following fish reef species:

  • red snapper
  • gag
  • greater amberjack
  • lesser amberjack
  • banded rudderfish
  • almaco jack
  • red grouper
  • black grouper
  • vermilion snapper
  • gray triggerfish

Visit the FWC website for more information.

 

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President Obama Decrees North Aleutian Basin and Bristol Bay off Limits to Oil and Gas Drilling

 

aleutian basin

On December 16 President Obama signed a presidential memorandum that will indefinitely protect Bristol Bay along with the Northern Aleutian Basin located in the Bering Sea just north of the Alaskan peninsula. “Bristol Bay has supported Native Americans in the Alaska region for centuries,” Obama stated in a video released by the White House. “It supports about $2 billion in the commercial fishing industry, supplies America with forty percent of its wild-caught seafood. It is a beautiful natural wonder, and it’s something that’s too precious for us to just be putting out to the highest bidder.”

 

bristol bay

Read more at: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/12/17/obama-declares-bristol-bay-limits-new-oil-and-gas-drilling-leases-158329

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SC Ports Authority Exceed Ship Traffic Expectations

SC Ports Authority Exceed Ship Traffic Expectations

On Wednesday, November 19, South Carolina Ports Authority (SCPA) announced that the October 2014 port traffic was not only above the figures from last year, but above the set expectations. SCPA president and CEO Jim Newsome stated, "While we are pleased with the strong levels of growth, we expect this growth to moderate in the last two months of the year and into next year. We do believe that the South Atlantic port market will continue to outperform the U.S. port market due to strength in manufacturing along with overall regional growth."

Newsome also discussed his gratitude for the statewide support for harbor deepening during the public comment period, stating, "We are grateful for the positive comments received concerning the Charleston harbor deepening study. Upon completion, the project will give Charleston the deepest harbor on the U.S. East Coast.”

Check out the SCPA News Release to read more.

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Understanding the Linkage between Harmful Algae Blooms and Bird Deaths

Understanding the Linkage between Harmful Algae Blooms and Bird Deaths

In 2007, hundreds of migratory birds were mysteriously found stranded or dead in Monterey Bay, California.  This was the beginning of a quest that brought together specialists who helped discover the link between algae blooms and bird strandings. A red tide caused by a type of marine plankton called Akashiwo sanguinea had been occurring during this massive bird mortality event in Monterey Bay, but researchers were finding it hard to link the two events and identify the actual culprit until tests were performed on an abundant substance found throughout the bay area--sea foam. Tests performed on the foam determined that the algae was in fact nontoxic, but the foam created by the churning of decaying organisms was impairing the water repellency of the birds’ feathers (similar to the effect detergent would have on them) and allowing the underlying skin to be exposed, thus leading to hypothermia.

Because of research following events such as the 2007 incident in Monterey Bay, many organizations and government agencies now understand the significance of monitoring our ocean currents and algae blooms in real time, which in turn will hopefully lead to better mitigation of future scenarios. You can read more about the Monterey Bay study at PLOS One, an online research journal.

Sources:

http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/seafoam.html

http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/news/weeklynews/mar09/algalfoam.html

http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0004550

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New App Developed to Alert Mariners of Nearby Whale Sightings

New App Developed to Alert Mariners of Nearby Whale Sightings

A new app has been developed with the collaboration of government agencies, academic institutions, non-profit conservation groups, and private-sector companies to help reduce the chance of fatal ship strikes by displaying near real-time warnings along both the US and the Canadian Coasts. The app will display nearby whale sightings, active management areas, recommended routes, areas to be avoided, and required whale reporting areas. The app also features a photo-capture option to help identify which species of whale is being sighted and a description along with the GPS coordinates of the sighting. The maritime community and the public can report these sightings. The reports will be relayed in real time to leading whale researchers and state and federal management authorities. In some cases, whale sightings may provoke “over-flights” by either the National Marine Fisheries Service or the U.S. Coast Guard, who will then determine whether if there is a need to create temporary speed restrictions for the area.

For more information on Whale Alert, visit http://www.whalealert.org. Similar apps have been developed for manatees and sharks and can be downloaded for free via iTunes in the Apple App Store.

 

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Two Innovative Florida Cities Reuse Stormwater Runoff

Two Innovative Florida Cities Reuse Stormwater Runoff

 

Pioneering new solutions in Florida for the treatment and reuse of stormwater runoff, the City of Altamonte Springs, the City of Apopka, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), the St. Johns River Water Management District, and the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) have teamed up to create a project called A‑FIRST (FDOT Integrated Reuse and Stormwater Treatment). According to DEP’s website, A-FIRST is a $12.5-million project that captures the stormwater from I-4 then directs it to a water treatment facility where it is piped into the cities’ reclaimed water supply. The water is used for irrigation and as an alternative water supply for Apopka. According to DEP’s website, the treatment of this water is expected to cut back on the amount of phosphorus and nitrogen entering the Little Wekiva River by 99% and 98%, respectively. In many places around the world, developing sustainable uses for stormwater runoff is nothing new. However, in Florida, it is a breakthrough!

Sources:

http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/FLDEP/bulletins/bd3cf8

http://www.altamonte.org/index.aspx?NID=699

 

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ANAMAR Crew Completes Assessment of the Columbia River ODMDS

ANAMAR Crew Completes Assessment of the Columbia River ODMDS

ANAMAR scientists have been working off the coast of Oregon at the mouth of the Columbia River monitoring the chemical, physical, and biological aspects of an ocean dredged material disposal site (ODMDS). Part of the goal for this project was to calculate the health and abundance of epifauna and infauna in the area, including an important species, the Dungeness crab.

Pictured is the crew preparing crab traps.

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President Obama Intends to Designate Largest Marine Preserve in the World

President Obama Intends to Designate Largest Marine Preserve in the World

On June 17, President Obama announced his intent to expand the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument (which covers areas south of Hawaii near mostly uninhabited islands controlled by the United States) from its current size of 87,000 square miles to nearly 782,000 square miles. This action would double the amount of protected marine area globally and is an attempt at trying to help global environmental issues such as ocean acidification, pollution, and overfishing. The president is also teaming up with other federal agencies to strengthen the seafood industry and to help prevent seafood fraud and global black-market fish trade. According to a 2-year seafood study performed by the University of British Columbia, up to 32% of wild shrimp, crab, salmon, pollock, tuna, and other catch imported into the United States are caught illegally. After a public comment period, this marine preservation action is expected to go into effect later this year, creating the largest protected marine preserve in the world. 

Click here for the White House Press Release. 

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NOAA Ocean Exploration Team to Begin the 2014 Expedition

NOAA Ocean Exploration Team to Begin the 2014 Expedition

During June through October, NOAA’s ocean exploration team will begin their 2014 expedition spanning from the Gulf of Mexico to the Caribbean Sea. The team will be live-broadcasting their travels aboard the ocean explorer ship Nautilus and will be using two remotely operated vehicles to obtain an assortment of data from the oceans floor using various methods, including acoustical mapping from high-resolution sonar devices. This mission will delve into various scientific curiosities such as the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010, various Gulf of Mexico shipwrecks, and geological hazards in the Caribbean Sea.

You can meet the team and follow the explorations starting June 11 at  www.nautiluslive.org.

 


 

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ANAMAR’s President Nadia Lombardero Co-Presenting a Paper with the Region 4 EPA at 33rd PIANC World Congressional Conference

 Nadia Lombardero is in San Francisco at the 33rd PIANC World Congress where the theme is “Navigating the New Millennium.” Nadia is co-presenting a paper with EPA Region 4 entitled “Monitoring, Assessment and the Remediation of Elevated PCB Levels at a Deepwater ODMDS.”  Ocean Dredge Material Disposal Sites (ODMDS) are critical components of the nation’s navigation requirements and national security.  Disposal site monitoring is a requirement of the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA) and is conducted to ensure the environmental integrity of a disposal site and the areas surrounding the site to ensure that contaminants are kept out of the food chain and in compliance with the law.

 

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