Charleston Harbor Deepening Awaits Approval from Congress

Charleston Harbor waiting authorization from Congress for deepening.
1 minute reading time (134 words)

It’s Time For Florida’s Non-Native Species Q & A!

It’s Time For Florida’s Non-Native Species Q & A!

Q: Are all of Florida’s non-native species invasive?

A: No, not all non-native species are invasive. Only the plants and animals that can actually survive are considered invasive species. According to the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, only 4% to 19% of all non-native species survive in the United States and actually become invasive. Two types of invasive species need to have special permits in order to be obtained: conditional species and prohibited species. Below are links to more information concerning these special permits as well as lists of the species covered by the permits.

http://myfwc.com/license/wildlife/nonnative-species/

Conditional Species:

http://www.myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/nonnatives/conditional-prohibited-species/conditional/

Prohibited Species:

http://www.myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/nonnatives/conditional-prohibited-species/prohibited/

** Pictured above is the Diaprepes Root Weevil. This Florida Invasive Species is said to eat the roots of citrus trees and cause harmful affects on over 270 different other plant species.

Scientists Venture to the Southern Ocean (Antarcti...
Keeping up with Watering Restrictions
 

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